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Beef

When it comes to carbohydrate content, beef products are certainly at the low end of the range. Beef it typically high in protein with little to no carbohydrate content. This would seem to make beef an excellent choice for both low-carb dieters and diabetics. However, this seemingly favorable nutritional makeup doesn’t necessarily open the door to unlimited beef consumption.

A proper diet for diabetics and dieters alike depend on proper portion control. Beef can certainly be considered part of a healthy, low-carb diet, but shouldn’t be consumed in unlimited quantities.

One thing you have to watch for in cuts of beef is the level of fat. Some cuts of beef can end up adding a great deal of fat to your diet. In the interest of limiting your risk for other conditions, you would do well to restrict your beef intake to the leaner cuts.

More than a few studies have called into question the wisdom of eating red meat, citing various health risks. However, there are some benefits to consuming red meat in sensible portions. For example, beef is high in zinc, which can support immune system health. It is also rich in easily accessible iron. Vital minerals like phosphorus, potassium and magnesium are found in red meat. Eating lean red meat is associated with many weight loss success stories.

On the other hand, red meat has been linked to an increased risk of bowel cancer. Red meat consumption has also been connected to increased risk for arthritis and osteoporosis. A diet with large amounts of beef can add significant amounts of saturated fat and cholesterol. Recent studies have also linked red meat to breast cancer.

Some people may prefer not to eat red meat for ethical reasons. Common substitutes for beef include dry beans, which provide high levels of fiber and protein at a much lower cost. Textured vegetable protein is also available that is designed to look and taste like real ground beef.

The bottom line on beef is that lean versions can prove to be an excellent source of protein and iron without adding to your overall carbohydrate intake. As with most foods, choosing the highest quality cuts and controlling the portions you eat is the best defense against any ill effects that may come from eating beef.



variety meats and by-products bottom sirloin brisket
carcass chuck composite of trimmed retail cuts
cured flank ground
loin plate retail cuts
rib eye rib round
sandwich steaks shank crosscuts short loin
tenderloin top loin top sirloin
variety meats and by-products beef patties with VPP beef




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